9781590171967-1590171969-The Slynx (New York Review Books Classics)

The Slynx (New York Review Books Classics)

ISBN-13: 9781590171967
ISBN-10: 1590171969
Edition: Main
Author: Tolstaya, Tatyana
Publication date: 2007
Publisher: NYRB Classics
Format: Paperback 320 pages
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Book details

ISBN-13: 9781590171967
ISBN-10: 1590171969
Edition: Main
Author: Tolstaya, Tatyana
Publication date: 2007
Publisher: NYRB Classics
Format: Paperback 320 pages

Summary

Acknowledged authors Tolstaya, Tatyana wrote The Slynx (New York Review Books Classics) comprising 320 pages back in 2007. Textbook and eTextbook are published under ISBN 1590171969 and 9781590171967. Since then The Slynx (New York Review Books Classics) textbook was available to sell back to BooksRun online for the top buyback price of $ 2.27 or rent at the marketplace.

Description

New in Paperback

“A postmodern literary masterpiece.” –The Times Literary Supplement

Two hundred years after civilization ended in an event known as the Blast, Benedikt isn’t one to complain. He’s got a job—transcribing old books and presenting them as the words of the great new leader, Fyodor Kuzmich, Glorybe—and though he doesn’t enjoy the privileged status of a Murza, at least he’s not a serf or a half-human four-legged Degenerator harnessed to a troika. He has a house, too, with enough mice to cook up a tasty meal, and he’s happily free of mutations: no extra fingers, no gills, no cockscombs sprouting from his eyelids. And he’s managed—at least so far—to steer clear of the ever-vigilant Saniturions, who track down anyone who manifests the slightest sign of Freethinking, and the legendary screeching Slynx that waits in the wilderness beyond.

Tatyana Tolstaya’s The Slynx reimagines dystopian fantasy as a wild, horripilating amusement park ride. Poised between Nabokov’s Pale Fire and Burgess’s A Clockwork Orange, The Slynx is a brilliantly inventive and shimmeringly ambiguous work of art: an account of a degraded world that is full of echoes of the sublime literature of Russia’s past; a grinning portrait of human inhumanity; a tribute to art in both its sovereignty and its helplessness; a vision of the past as the future in which the future is now.
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