9781469653266-1469653265-Searching for Black Confederates: The Civil War’s Most Persistent Myth (Civil War America)

Searching for Black Confederates: The Civil War’s Most Persistent Myth (Civil War America)

ISBN-13: 9781469653266
ISBN-10: 1469653265
Edition: Illustrated
Author: Levin, Kevin M.
Publication date: 2019
Publisher: University of North Carolina Press
Format: Hardcover 240 pages
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Book details

ISBN-13: 9781469653266
ISBN-10: 1469653265
Edition: Illustrated
Author: Levin, Kevin M.
Publication date: 2019
Publisher: University of North Carolina Press
Format: Hardcover 240 pages

Summary

Acknowledged authors Levin, Kevin M. wrote Searching for Black Confederates: The Civil War’s Most Persistent Myth (Civil War America) comprising 240 pages back in 2019. Textbook and eTextbook are published under ISBN 1469653265 and 9781469653266. Since then Searching for Black Confederates: The Civil War’s Most Persistent Myth (Civil War America) textbook was available to sell back to BooksRun online for the top buyback price of $ 3.45 or rent at the marketplace.

Description

More than 150 years after the end of the Civil War, scores of websites, articles, and organizations repeat claims that anywhere between 500 and 100,000 free and enslaved African Americans fought willingly as soldiers in the Confederate army. But as Kevin M. Levin argues in this carefully researched book, such claims would have shocked anyone who served in the army during the war itself. Levin explains that imprecise contemporary accounts, poorly understood primary-source material, and other misrepresentations helped fuel the rise of the black Confederate myth. Moreover, Levin shows that belief in the existence of black Confederate soldiers largely originated in the 1970s, a period that witnessed both a significant shift in how Americans remembered the Civil War and a rising backlash against African Americans' gains in civil rights and other realms.

Levin also investigates the roles that African Americans actually performed in the Confederate army, including personal body servants and forced laborers. He demonstrates that regardless of the dangers these men faced in camp, on the march, and on the battlefield, their legal status remained unchanged. Even long after the guns fell silent, Confederate veterans and other writers remembered these men as former slaves and not as soldiers, an important reminder that how the war is remembered often runs counter to history.

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