9781469652511-146965251X-Inventing Disaster: The Culture of Calamity from the Jamestown Colony to the Johnstown Flood

Inventing Disaster: The Culture of Calamity from the Jamestown Colony to the Johnstown Flood

ISBN-13: 9781469652511
ISBN-10: 146965251X
Edition: Illustrated
Author: Kierner, Cynthia A.
Publication date: 2019
Publisher: University of North Carolina Press
Format: Hardcover 304 pages
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Book details

ISBN-13: 9781469652511
ISBN-10: 146965251X
Edition: Illustrated
Author: Kierner, Cynthia A.
Publication date: 2019
Publisher: University of North Carolina Press
Format: Hardcover 304 pages

Summary

Acknowledged authors Kierner, Cynthia A. wrote Inventing Disaster: The Culture of Calamity from the Jamestown Colony to the Johnstown Flood comprising 304 pages back in 2019. Textbook and eTextbook are published under ISBN 146965251X and 9781469652511. Since then Inventing Disaster: The Culture of Calamity from the Jamestown Colony to the Johnstown Flood textbook was available to sell back to BooksRun online for the top buyback price of $ 2.72 or rent at the marketplace.

Description

When hurricanes, earthquakes, wildfires, and other disasters strike, we count our losses, search for causes, commiserate with victims, and initiate relief efforts. Amply illustrated and expansively researched, Inventing Disaster explains the origins and development of this predictable, even ritualized, culture of calamity over three centuries, exploring its roots in the revolutions in science, information, and emotion that were part of the Age of Enlightenment in Europe and America.

Beginning with the collapse of the early seventeenth-century Jamestown colony, ending with the deadly Johnstown flood of 1889, and highlighting fires, epidemics, earthquakes, and exploding steamboats along the way, Cynthia A. Kierner tells horrific stories of culturally significant calamities and their victims and charts efforts to explain, prevent, and relieve disaster-related losses. Although how we interpret and respond to disasters has changed in some ways since the nineteenth century, Kierner demonstrates that, for better or worse, the intellectual, economic, and political environments of earlier eras forged our own twenty-first-century approach to disaster, shaping the stories we tell, the precautions we ponder, and the remedies we prescribe for disaster-ravaged communities.

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