9780826324245-082632424X-The Language of Blood: The Making of Spanish-American Identity in New Mexico, 1880s-1930s

The Language of Blood: The Making of Spanish-American Identity in New Mexico, 1880s-1930s

ISBN-13: 9780826324245
ISBN-10: 082632424X
Edition: Illustrated
Author: Nieto-Phillips, John M.
Publication date: 2008
Publisher: University of New Mexico Press
Format: Paperback 328 pages
FREE shipping on ALL orders

Book details

ISBN-13: 9780826324245
ISBN-10: 082632424X
Edition: Illustrated
Author: Nieto-Phillips, John M.
Publication date: 2008
Publisher: University of New Mexico Press
Format: Paperback 328 pages

Summary

Acknowledged authors Nieto-Phillips, John M. wrote The Language of Blood: The Making of Spanish-American Identity in New Mexico, 1880s-1930s comprising 328 pages back in 2008. Textbook and eTextbook are published under ISBN 082632424X and 9780826324245. Since then The Language of Blood: The Making of Spanish-American Identity in New Mexico, 1880s-1930s textbook was available to sell back to BooksRun online for the top buyback price of $ 3.96 or rent at the marketplace.

Description

When the United States declared war on Spain in 1898, rumors abounded throughout the nation that the Spanish-speaking population of New Mexico secretly sympathized with the enemy. At the end of the war, The New York Times warned that New Mexico's "Mexicans professed a deep hostility to American ideas and American policies." As long as Spanish remained the primary language of public instruction, the Times admonished, "the majority of the inhabitants will remain 'Mexican' and retain a pseudo-allegiance [to Spain]."

This perception of Spanish-speaking New Mexicans as "un-American" was widely shared. Such allegations of disloyalty, coupled with the prevalent views that all Mexican peoples were racially non-white and "unfit" to assume the rights and responsibilities of full citizenship, inspired powerful reactions among the Spanish-speaking people of New Mexico. Most sought to distinguish themselves from Mexican immigrants by emphasizing their "Spanish" roots. Tourism, too, began to foster the myth that nuevomexicanos were culturally and racially Spanish. Since the 1950s, historians, sociologists, and anthropologists have dismissed the ubiquitous Spanish heritage claimed by many New Mexicans.

John M. Nieto-Phillips, himself a nuevomexicano, argues that Spanish-American identity evolved out of a medieval rhetoric about blood purity, or limpieza de sangre, as well as a modern longing to enter the United States's white body politic.

Rate this book Rate this book

We would LOVE it if you could help us and other readers by reviewing the book