9780822358077-0822358077-Shine: The Visual Economy of Light in African Diasporic Aesthetic Practice

Shine: The Visual Economy of Light in African Diasporic Aesthetic Practice

ISBN-13: 9780822358077
ISBN-10: 0822358077
Author: Thompson, Krista A.
Publication date: 2015
Publisher: Duke University Press Books
Format: Paperback 368 pages
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Book details

ISBN-13: 9780822358077
ISBN-10: 0822358077
Author: Thompson, Krista A.
Publication date: 2015
Publisher: Duke University Press Books
Format: Paperback 368 pages

Summary

Acknowledged authors Thompson, Krista A. wrote Shine: The Visual Economy of Light in African Diasporic Aesthetic Practice comprising 368 pages back in 2015. Textbook and eTextbook are published under ISBN 0822358077 and 9780822358077. Since then Shine: The Visual Economy of Light in African Diasporic Aesthetic Practice textbook was available to sell back to BooksRun online for the top buyback price or rent at the marketplace.

Description

In Jamaican dancehalls competition for the video camera's light is stiff, so much so that dancers sometimes bleach their skin to enhance their visibility. In the Bahamas, tuxedoed students roll into prom in tricked-out sedans, staging grand red-carpet entrances that are designed to ensure they are seen being photographed. Throughout the United States and Jamaica friends pose in front of hand-painted backgrounds of Tupac, flashy cars, or brand-name products popularized in hip-hop culture in countless makeshift roadside photography studios. And visual artists such as Kehinde Wiley remix the aesthetic of Western artists with hip-hop culture in their portraiture. In Shine, Krista Thompson examines these and other photographic practices in the Caribbean and United States, arguing that performing for the camera is more important than the final image itself. For the members of these African diasporic communities, seeking out the camera's light—whether from a cell phone, Polaroid, or video camera—provides a means with which to represent themselves in the public sphere. The resulting images, Thompson argues, become their own forms of memory, modernity, value, and social status that allow for cultural formation within and between African diasporic communities.

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