9780813941929-081394192X-Pulpit and Nation: Clergymen and the Politics of Revolutionary America (Jeffersonian America)

Pulpit and Nation: Clergymen and the Politics of Revolutionary America (Jeffersonian America)

ISBN-13: 9780813941929
ISBN-10: 081394192X
Edition: Reprint
Author: McBride, Spencer W.
Publication date: 2018
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
Format: Paperback 272 pages
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Book details

ISBN-13: 9780813941929
ISBN-10: 081394192X
Edition: Reprint
Author: McBride, Spencer W.
Publication date: 2018
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
Format: Paperback 272 pages

Summary

Acknowledged authors McBride, Spencer W. wrote Pulpit and Nation: Clergymen and the Politics of Revolutionary America (Jeffersonian America) comprising 272 pages back in 2018. Textbook and eTextbook are published under ISBN 081394192X and 9780813941929. Since then Pulpit and Nation: Clergymen and the Politics of Revolutionary America (Jeffersonian America) textbook was available to sell back to BooksRun online for the top buyback price or rent at the marketplace.

Description

In Pulpit and Nation, Spencer McBride highlights the importance of Protestant clergymen in early American political culture, elucidating the actual role of religion in the founding era. Beginning with colonial precedents for clerical involvement in politics and concluding with false rumors of Thomas Jefferson’s conversion to Christianity in 1817, this book reveals the ways in which the clergy’s political activism―and early Americans’ general use of religious language and symbols in their political discourse―expanded and evolved to become an integral piece in the invention of an American national identity. Offering a fresh examination of some of the key junctures in the development of the American political system―the Revolution, the ratification debates of 1787–88, and the formation of political parties in the 1790s―McBride shows how religious arguments, sentiments, and motivations were subtly interwoven with political ones in the creation of the early American republic. Ultimately, Pulpit and Nation reveals that while religious expression was common in the political culture of the Revolutionary era, it was as much the calculated design of ambitious men seeking power as it was the natural outgrowth of a devoutly religious people.

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