9780807846285-0807846287-Glorious Contentment: The Grand Army of the Republic, 1865-1900 (Civil War America)

Glorious Contentment: The Grand Army of the Republic, 1865-1900 (Civil War America)

ISBN-13: 9780807846285
ISBN-10: 0807846287
Edition: Reprint
Author: McConnell, Stuart
Publication date: 1997
Publisher: University of North Carolina Press
Format: Paperback 332 pages
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Book details

ISBN-13: 9780807846285
ISBN-10: 0807846287
Edition: Reprint
Author: McConnell, Stuart
Publication date: 1997
Publisher: University of North Carolina Press
Format: Paperback 332 pages

Summary

Acknowledged authors McConnell, Stuart wrote Glorious Contentment: The Grand Army of the Republic, 1865-1900 (Civil War America) comprising 332 pages back in 1997. Textbook and eTextbook are published under ISBN 0807846287 and 9780807846285. Since then Glorious Contentment: The Grand Army of the Republic, 1865-1900 (Civil War America) textbook was available to sell back to BooksRun online for the top buyback price or rent at the marketplace.

Description

The Grand Army of the Republic, the largest of all Union Army veterans' organizations, was the most powerful single-issue political lobby of the late nineteenth century, securing massive pensions for veterans and helping to elect five postwar presidents from its own membership. To its members, it was also a secret fraternal order, a source of local charity, a provider of entertainment in small municipalities, and a patriotic organization. Using GAR convention proceedings, newspapers, songs, rule books, and local post records, Stuart McConnell examines this influential veterans' association during the years of its greatest strength.

Beginning with a close look at the men who joined the GAR in three localities -- Philadelphia; Brockton, Massachusetts; and Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin - McConnell goes on to examine the Union veterans' attitudes towards their former Confederate enemies and toward a whole range of noncombatants whom the verterans called "civilians": stay-at-home townsfolk, Mugwump penion reformers, freedmen, women, and their own sons and daughters. In the GAR, McConnell sees a group of veterans trying to cope with questions concerning the extent of society's obligation to the poor and injured, the place of war memories in peacetime, and the meaning of the "nation" and the individual's relation to it.

McConnell aruges that, by the 1890s, the GAR was clinging to a preservationist version of American nationalism that many white, middle-class Northerners found congenial in the face of the social upheavals of that decade. In effect, he concludes, the nineteenth-century career of the GAR is a study in the microcosm of a nation trying to hold fast to an older image of itself in the face of massive social change.

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