9780806155814-0806155817-A Dragon's Head and a Serpent's Tail: Ming China and the First Great East Asian War, 1592–1598 (Volume 20) (Campaigns and Commanders Series)

A Dragon's Head and a Serpent's Tail: Ming China and the First Great East Asian War, 1592–1598 (Volume 20) (Campaigns and Commanders Series)

ISBN-13: 9780806155814
ISBN-10: 0806155817
Edition: Reprint
Author: Swope Ph.D, Dr. Kenneth M.
Publication date: 2016
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
Format: Paperback 424 pages
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Book details

ISBN-13: 9780806155814
ISBN-10: 0806155817
Edition: Reprint
Author: Swope Ph.D, Dr. Kenneth M.
Publication date: 2016
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
Format: Paperback 424 pages

Summary

Acknowledged authors Swope Ph.D, Dr. Kenneth M. wrote A Dragon's Head and a Serpent's Tail: Ming China and the First Great East Asian War, 1592–1598 (Volume 20) (Campaigns and Commanders Series) comprising 424 pages back in 2016. Textbook and eTextbook are published under ISBN 0806155817 and 9780806155814. Since then A Dragon's Head and a Serpent's Tail: Ming China and the First Great East Asian War, 1592–1598 (Volume 20) (Campaigns and Commanders Series) textbook was available to sell back to BooksRun online for the top buyback price or rent at the marketplace.

Description

The invasion of Korea by Japanese troops in May of 1592 was no ordinary military expedition: it was one of the decisive events in Asian history and the most tragic for the Korean peninsula until the mid-twentieth century. Japanese overlord Toyotomi Hideyoshi envisioned conquering Korea, Ming China, and eventually all of Asia; but Korea’s appeal to China’s Emperor Wanli for assistance triggered a six-year war involving hundreds of thousands of soldiers and encompassing the whole region. For Japan, the war was “a dragon’s head followed by a serpent’s tail”: an impressive beginning with no real ending.

Kenneth M. Swope has undertaken the first full-length scholarly study in English of this important conflict. Drawing on Korean, Japanese, and especially Chinese sources, he corrects the Japan-centered perspective of previous accounts and depicts Wanli not as the self-indulgent ruler of received interpretations but rather one actively engaged in military affairs—and concerned especially with rescuing China’s client state of Korea. He puts the Ming in a more vigorous light, detailing Chinese siege warfare, the development and deployment of innovative military technologies, and the naval battles that marked the climax of the war. He also explains the war’s repercussions outside the military sphere—particularly the dynamics of intraregional diplomacy within the shadow of the Chinese tributary system.

What Swope calls the First Great East Asian War marked both the emergence of Japan’s desire to extend its sphere of influence to the Chinese mainland and a military revival of China’s commitment to defending its interests in Northeast Asia. Swope’s account offers new insight not only into the history of warfare in Asia but also into a conflict that reverberates in international relations to this day.

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