9780804010016-0804010013-Ancient Sisterhood: The Lost Traditions of Hagar and Sarah

Ancient Sisterhood: The Lost Traditions of Hagar and Sarah

ISBN-13: 9780804010016
ISBN-10: 0804010013
Edition: 1
Author: Teubal, Savina J.
Publication date: 1997
Publisher: Swallow Press
Format: Paperback 270 pages
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Book details

ISBN-13: 9780804010016
ISBN-10: 0804010013
Edition: 1
Author: Teubal, Savina J.
Publication date: 1997
Publisher: Swallow Press
Format: Paperback 270 pages

Summary

Acknowledged authors Teubal, Savina J. wrote Ancient Sisterhood: The Lost Traditions of Hagar and Sarah comprising 270 pages back in 1997. Textbook and eTextbook are published under ISBN 0804010013 and 9780804010016. Since then Ancient Sisterhood: The Lost Traditions of Hagar and Sarah textbook was available to sell back to BooksRun online for the top buyback price or rent at the marketplace.

Description

In this fascinating piece of scholarly detective work, biblical scholar Savina J. Teubal peels away millenia of patriarchal distortion to reveal the lost tradition of biblical matriarchs. In Ancient Sisterhood: The Lost Traditions of Hagar and Sarah (originally published as Hagar the Egyptian), she shows that Hagar, the mother of Ishmael, was actually lady-in-waiting to the priestess Sarah and participated in an ancient Near Eastern custom of surrogate motherhood.

Ancient Sisterhood cites evidence that Hebrew women actually enjoyed the privileges and sanctity of their own religious practices. These practices, however, were gradually eroded and usurped by the establishment of patriarchal monarchies that were based on militaristic conquest and power. Teubal examines the figures of Hagar and Sarah from a feminist perspective that combines thorough scholarship with an informed and detailed understanding of the cultural and religious influences from which the mysterious biblical figure of Hagar emerged. She looks at Hagar's important role in the genesis of Hebrew culture, her role as mother of the Islamic nations, and her power as a matriarch as opposed to her apparent status as a concubine.

Teubal posits two distinct sources for the Hagar episodes: Hagar as companion to Sarah and an unknown woman whom she refers to as the desert matriarch. She explores whether Hagar was a slave to Abraham or Sarah, the differences between Hagar and the desert matriarch, and the obscurantism of these important elements in biblical texts. Teubal sheds considerable light on two central figures of these world religions and “the disassociation of woman from her own female religious experience.”

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