9780520290518-0520290518-Unsettled: Denial and Belonging Among White Kenyans (Volume 10) (Ethnographic Studies in Subjectivity)

Unsettled: Denial and Belonging Among White Kenyans (Volume 10) (Ethnographic Studies in Subjectivity)

ISBN-13: 9780520290518
ISBN-10: 0520290518
Edition: First
Author: McIntosh, Janet
Publication date: 2016
Publisher: University of California Press
Format: Paperback 312 pages
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Book details

ISBN-13: 9780520290518
ISBN-10: 0520290518
Edition: First
Author: McIntosh, Janet
Publication date: 2016
Publisher: University of California Press
Format: Paperback 312 pages

Summary

Acknowledged authors McIntosh, Janet wrote Unsettled: Denial and Belonging Among White Kenyans (Volume 10) (Ethnographic Studies in Subjectivity) comprising 312 pages back in 2016. Textbook and eTextbook are published under ISBN 0520290518 and 9780520290518. Since then Unsettled: Denial and Belonging Among White Kenyans (Volume 10) (Ethnographic Studies in Subjectivity) textbook was available to sell back to BooksRun online for the top buyback price or rent at the marketplace.

Description

Honorable Mention for the 2018 American Ethnological Society Senior Book Prize

Honorable Mention for the 2017 Victor Turner Prize for Ethnographic Writing presented by the American Anthropological Association

In 1963, Kenya gained independence from Britain, ending decades of white colonial rule. While tens of thousands of whites relocated in fear of losing their fortunes, many stayed. But over the past decade, protests, scandals, and upheavals have unsettled families with colonial origins, reminding them that their belonging is tenuous.

In this book, Janet McIntosh looks at the lives and dilemmas of settler descendants living in post-independence Kenya. From clinging to a lost colonial identity to pronouncing a new Kenyan nationality, the public face of white Kenyans has undergone changes fraught with ambiguity. Drawing on fieldwork and interviews, McIntosh focuses on their discourse and narratives to ask: What stories do settler descendants tell about their claim to belong in Kenya? How do they situate themselves vis-a-vis the colonial past and anti-colonial sentiment, phrasing and re-phrasing their memories and judgments as they seek a position they feel is ethically acceptable? McIntosh explores contradictory and diverse responses: moral double consciousness, aspirations to uplift the nation, ideological blind-spots, denials, and self-doubt as her respondents strain to defend their entitlements in the face of mounting Kenyan rhetorics of ancestry.
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