9780299321000-0299321002-Athens, Etruria, and the Many Lives of Greek Figured Pottery (Wisconsin Studies in Classics)

Athens, Etruria, and the Many Lives of Greek Figured Pottery (Wisconsin Studies in Classics)

ISBN-13: 9780299321000
ISBN-10: 0299321002
Edition: Illustrated
Author: Bundrick, Sheramy D.
Publication date: 2019
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Format: Hardcover 352 pages
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Book details

ISBN-13: 9780299321000
ISBN-10: 0299321002
Edition: Illustrated
Author: Bundrick, Sheramy D.
Publication date: 2019
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Format: Hardcover 352 pages

Summary

Acknowledged authors Bundrick, Sheramy D. wrote Athens, Etruria, and the Many Lives of Greek Figured Pottery (Wisconsin Studies in Classics) comprising 352 pages back in 2019. Textbook and eTextbook are published under ISBN 0299321002 and 9780299321000. Since then Athens, Etruria, and the Many Lives of Greek Figured Pottery (Wisconsin Studies in Classics) textbook was available to sell back to BooksRun online for the top buyback price or rent at the marketplace.

Description

A lucrative trade in Athenian pottery flourished from the early sixth until the late fifth century B.C.E., finding an eager market in Etruria. Most studies of these painted vases focus on the artistry and worldview of the Greeks who made them, but Sheramy D. Bundrick shifts attention to their Etruscan customers, ancient trade networks, and archaeological contexts.

Thousands of Greek painted vases have emerged from excavations of tombs, sanctuaries, and settlements throughout Etruria, from southern coastal centers to northern communities in the Po Valley. Using documented archaeological assemblages, especially from tombs in southern Etruria, Bundrick challenges the widely held assumption that Etruscans were hellenized through Greek imports. She marshals evidence to show that Etruscan consumers purposefully selected figured pottery that harmonized with their own local needs and customs, so much so that the vases are better described as etruscanized. Athenian ceramic workers, she contends, learned from traders which shapes and imagery sold best to the Etruscans and employed a variety of strategies to maximize artistry, output, and profit.

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