9780253210487-0253210488-Blood Relations: Caribbean Immigrants and the Harlem Community, 1900–1930 (Blacks in the Diaspora)

Blood Relations: Caribbean Immigrants and the Harlem Community, 1900–1930 (Blacks in the Diaspora)

ISBN-13: 9780253210487
ISBN-10: 0253210488
Author: Watkins-Owens, Irma
Publication date: 1996
Publisher: Indiana University Press
Format: Paperback 256 pages
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Book details

ISBN-13: 9780253210487
ISBN-10: 0253210488
Author: Watkins-Owens, Irma
Publication date: 1996
Publisher: Indiana University Press
Format: Paperback 256 pages

Summary

Acknowledged authors Watkins-Owens, Irma wrote Blood Relations: Caribbean Immigrants and the Harlem Community, 1900–1930 (Blacks in the Diaspora) comprising 256 pages back in 1996. Textbook and eTextbook are published under ISBN 0253210488 and 9780253210487. Since then Blood Relations: Caribbean Immigrants and the Harlem Community, 1900–1930 (Blacks in the Diaspora) textbook was available to sell back to BooksRun online for the top buyback price of $ 0.04 or rent at the marketplace.

Description

In Blood Relations, Irma Watkins-Owens focuses on the complex interaction of African Americans and African Caribbeans in Harlem during the first decades of the 20th century. Between 1900 and 1930, 40,000 Caribbean immigrants settled in New York City and joined with African Americans to create the unique ethnic community of Harlem. Watkins-Owens confronts issues of Caribbean immigrant and black American relations, placing their interaction in the context of community formation. She draws the reader into a cultural milieu that included the radical tradition of stepladder speaking; Marcus Garvey’s contentious leadership; the underground numbers operations of Caribbean immigrant entrepreneurs; and the literary renaissance and emergence of black journalists.

Through interviews, census data, and biography, Watkins-Owens shows how immigrants and southern African American migrants settled together in railroad flats and brownstones, worked primarily at service occupations, often lodged with relatives or home people, and strove to "make it" in New York.

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